Mike Lynn gave an interesting interview to Wired. Here’s some news about the FBI’s investigation.

Someone is setting up a legal defense fund for Lynn. Send donations via PayPal to Abaddon@IO.com. According to BoingBoing, donations not used to defend Lynn will be donated to the EFF.

Copies of Lynn’s talk have popped up on the Internet, but some have been removed due to legal cease-and-desist letters from ISS attorneys, like this one. Currently, Lynn’s slides are here,
cryptome.org,
jwdt.com,
yousendit.com,
megaupload.com,
dfconsultants.com,
security.nnov.ru,
mininova.org,
stephencollins.org,
jwdt.com,
priv.at.
(The list is from BoingBoing.)
Note that the presentation above is not the same as the one Lynn gave at . The presentation at didn’t have the ISS logo at the bottom, as the one on the Internet does. Also, the critical code components were blacked out. (Photographs of Lynn’s actual presentation slides were available here, but have been removed due to legal threats from ISS.)

There have been a bunch of commentary and analyses on the whole story. Business Week completely missed the point. Larry Seltzer at eWeek is more balanced.

Hackers are working overtime to reconstruct Lynn’s and write an exploit. This, of course,
means that we’re in much more danger of there being a that makes use of this .

The sad thing is that we could have avoided this. If and ISS had simply let Lynn present his work, it would have been just another obscure presentation amongst the sea of obscure presentations that is BlackHat. By attempting to muzzle Lynn, the two companies ensured that 1) the vulnerability was the biggest story of the conference, and 2)
some group of hackers would turn the vulnerability into exploit code just to get back at them.